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Ethnomusicology Forum seeks a new Book Reviews Editor. The position has a three-year term that begins in September 2023. There will be a five-month handover period (until January 2024) during which the incoming Book Reviews Editor can draw on the expertise of the outgoing one.

Ethnomusicology Forum is the academic journal of the British Forum for Ethnomusicology and is published by Taylor & Francis (T&F). Each yearly volume has three issues and each issue includes four or five book reviews.

The Book Reviews Editor appointment is normally for a period of three years, which may be extended by mutual consent, and is unpaid. The Book Reviews Editor will liaise with the journal Co-editors and have support from the Editorial Assistant. The Book Reviews Editor is responsible for identifying important ethnomusicological publications; soliciting and receiving review materials; selecting appropriate reviewers with an international perspective who can contribute insightful, informed and balanced reviews; arranging delivery to reviewers; and ensuring that timetables and deadlines are met. The Book Reviews Editor is also responsible for producing fully edited copy according to the designated house style for online submission to T&F.

The typical workload amounts to 2–3 hours per week throughout the year, although the workload fluctuates. There is some flexibility about the timing of the work, but copy and production deadlines need to be met in order to maintain academic credibility.

To submit an expression of interest, please send a two-page CV and a short statement (maximum 500 words) explaining your suitability for the position to frances.wilkinsatabdn.ac.uk. The deadline for applications is 31 May 2023. Please feel free to contact Frances Wilkins, the current Book Reviews Editor, with questions about the position.

Ethnomusicology Forum seeks a new Media Reviews Editor. The position has a three-year term that begins in September 2023. There will be a five-month handover period (until January 2024) during which the incoming Media Reviews Editor can draw on the expertise of the outgoing one.

Ethnomusicology Forum is the academic journal of the British Forum for Ethnomusicology and is published by Taylor & Francis (T&F). Each yearly volume has three issues and each issue includes one or two reviews that are the responsibility of the Media Reviews Editor.

The Media Reviews Editor appointment is normally for a period of three years, which may be extended by mutual consent, and is unpaid. The Media Reviews Editor will liaise with the journal Co-editors and have support from the Editorial Assistant. The Media Reviews Editor is responsible for identifying important ethnomusicological publications (websites and audio and video publications); soliciting and receiving review materials; selecting appropriate reviewers with an international perspective who can contribute insightful, informed and balanced reviews; arranging delivery to reviewers; and ensuring that timetables and deadlines are met. The Media Reviews Editor is also responsible for producing fully edited copy according to the designated house style for online submission to T&F.

The typical workload amounts to 2–3 hours per week throughout the year, although the workload fluctuates. There is some flexibility about the timing of the work, but copy and production deadlines need to be met in order to maintain academic credibility.

To submit an expression of interest, please send a two-page CV and a short statement (maximum 500 words) explaining your suitability for the position to phil.alexanderated.ac.uk. The deadline for applications is 31 May 2023. Please feel free to contact Phil Alexander, the current Media Reviews Editor, with questions about the position.

We are thrilled to welcome Thomas Graves as our new BFE Podcast Manager! Thomas holds a degree in Popular Music from the University of Kent and a master’s degree in Ethnomusicology from SOAS, University of London. He is currently a PhD candidate at Durham University studying musical emotion and qawwālī. His primary research interests lie in musical emotion, particularly in relation to lyrics, social context, and religion. His approach is multidisciplinary, with the aim of using ethnographic knowledge to inform psychological research in musical emotion, as well as adapting quantitative methods from music psychology to the ethnographic field.

Thomas joins the podcast team to help develop our expanding range of BFE podcasts, which now encompasses regular podcasts, student podcasts, and a Special Edition podcast series that focuses on the personal stories of individual people and calls for a rapid response from our discipline in relation to issues raised by BFE members.. To find out more about submitting a podcast, please visit the BFE Podcast Project webpage.

We are thrilled to announce that BFE member Jo Miller has just published her new book, Community-based Traditional Music in Scotland: A Pedagogy of Participation with Routledge (Ashgate Popular and Folk Music Series). The book draws on research from the fields of ethnomusicology, music education and community music to examine the community-based learning and teaching of ‘traditional’ music in contemporary Scotland, with implications for transnational theoretical issues. It offers a historical perspective on educational formats emerging from the mid-twentieth century folk music revival in Scotland. Ethnographic detail and musical transcriptions illustrate the practices through which participants encounter and perpetuate the idiom of traditional music: social music-making, learning by ear and participatory and presentational aspects of performances. Individuals also develop their own learning strategies to participate in the contemporary community of practice of traditional music. The work discusses how such experiences contribute to identity formation, including the role and practice of ‘tutors’ of traditional music. The author proposes conceptualising the teaching and learning of traditional music in community-based organisations as a ‘pedagogy of participation’. Further details can be found on the Routledge website.

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