BFE Student Prize

Submissions are invited for the BFE Student Prize, awarded each year for the best individually led student presentation at the BFE Annual Conference. The initiative is designed to recognise the research and creativity of student members of our scholarly community. To be eligible for this year’s prize, you must be a presenter at the BFE and ICTM Ireland Joint Annual Conference at University College Cork, and you must be a 2024 BFE member.

The BFE Executive Committee has revised the guidelines for the Student Prize to be more inclusive of diverse approaches to the presentation of research. Do not hesitate to contact us should you have questions about your submission or the guidelines.

There are two possible formats. Format 1 is the traditional paper submission from previous years; it may suit presenters who present from a prepared script. Format 2 is a video submission; it may suit presenters who give more extemporised presentations, presentations that incorporate an element of performance, and so on.

You are welcome to submit your presentation in whichever format you believe best suits its content. The BFE-appointed prize panel will be instructed to evaluate submissions in such a way that neither format is disadvantaged.

Format 1: Paper

Submit a paper as a PDF, Word or RTF attachment. You are also welcome to submit slides and sound or video files if these are an important part of the presentation. It is your responsibility to ensure that submitted files are received and that they will be accessible to the members of the judging panel. To this end, use common formats, avoid sending large files by email, and use a file-sharing service or a YouTube link (an unlisted link is fine) to transmit large audio or video files.

The submission should represent what you presented at the conference. The text of the paper should be as close as possible to what you said during your 20-minute time slot, although you are welcome to include a reference list. If you played extracts from the audio or video clips you submit, you should specify these by means of time codes; e.g., [Here I played 00:00 to 01:20 of Audio Example 2].

Format 2: Video recording

Submit a video recording of your live conference presentation, omitting the Q&A. The video should be in a common format such as MP4. You are welcome to submit slides and sound or video files if these were an important part of the presentation and are not clear in the video. (If you played extracts from the audio or video clips you submit, you should specify the portions you played by means of time codes.)

It is your responsibility to ensure that submitted files are received and that they will be accessible to the members of the judging panel. To this end, use accessible formats, avoid sending large files by email, and use a file-sharing service or a YouTube link (an unlisted link is fine) to transmit large files. The submission of a written paper and/or reference list (in Word, RTF, or PDF format) as accompanying material is optional.

The prize panel will assess video submissions for their content rather than their technical quality, although the picture and sound should be clear. This allows for submissions made on a device such as a smartphone.

Should you experience technical problems or other challenges at the conference, we can accept video recordings of your presentation made after the event and before the submission deadline. Post-recorded presentations should be as close to the conference presentation as possible and should not be revised in any way.

This prize is not awarded for contributions to roundtables or workshops or for presentations in poster or film format. Other innovative presentations may be accepted, however, subject to the agreement of the prize panel Chair.

Submissions should be emailed to Amanda Villepastour (VillepastourAVatCardiff.ac.uk). The deadline is noon on Monday 22nd April 2024. Prize winners may be encouraged to develop submissions into publications or podcasts.


2023 Competition

Following the BFE Annual Conference at The University of Edinburgh, April 2023, 16 papers were submitted for the BFE Student Prize. As the prize panel had the difficult task of assessing a particularly strong collection of papers this year, they made the unusual decision to nominate two honourable mentions this year. Many thanks to the panel, Heather Sparling (Cape Breton University, Chair), Elina Seye (University of Helsinki) and Joe Browning (City University, London).

The BFE Student Prize 2023 is awarded to Ivan Mouraviev for his outstanding paper, “Bass, Space, Place: The Mediation of London Dubstep Culture in an Online Discord Community.” This insightful and fascinating paper considers how a virtual music community can be understood as being organized around a “nostalgia genre” and how both online and offline spaces connected with that genre are reproduced in the virtual community. More broadly, the author aims to “stimulate discussion about how sonic cultures are preserved and remembered, and how the internet mediates musical genre and place” by addressing a community organized both virtually and in real life around dubstep, a form of electronic dance music (EDM) emergent in south London in the late 1990s. The argument is developed through a nuanced and mature synthesis of ethnography and theory, rooted in both current literature and fieldwork, both of which are integrated thoughtfully throughout the paper.

An Honourable mention is made to Pantea Armanfar for the paper, “The voice of laleh-va: a plant instrument in ab-bandan forming the mutual cultural heritage of wetlands and humans.” This very strong and beautifully written paper is about the relationship between a particular reed-like plant (laleh) found in Iran, its importance to the creation and maintenance of ab-bandans (human-made wetlands for water management and agriculture), its relationship to humans, and its voice in the laleh-va instrument (a woodwind instrument made of laleh). This conceptually ambitious paper offers a lovely integration of historical research and contemporary practices while addressing a number of contemporary concerns within ethnomusicology.

An Honourable Mention is also made to María del Mar Ocaña Guzmán for her paper, “‘Jewels’” within the Sound Archive: Unfolding the Metaphor’s Materialities.” This theoretically sophisticated paper maps an extensive network of metaphors surrounding the collection, curation and evaluation of archival recordings, revealing how they are understood and valued by archivists, scholars, musicians and others. The author treats the archive as an ethnographic field of study and opens up new ways of understanding the archive, a key institution for musicians engaging with historical music traditions as well as for ethnomusicologists.

 


Previous winners of the BFE Student Prize:

2022    Caetano Maschio Santos (Honourable Mention to Rowan Hawitt)
2021    Dunya Habash
2020    [Annual Conference postponed - no competition]
2019    Vicky Tadros
2017    Hamidreza Salehyar
2016    Esbjörn Wettermark
2015    Cassandre Balosso-Bardin, Deirdre Morgan (joint winners)
2014    Jennifer McCallum
2013    Thomas Western
2012    Joe Browning
2011    Emma Brinkhurst
2010    Stefanie Conn
2009    Sue Miller
2008    Ioannis Tsioulakis